Funding Opportunities Late February

South Boulder Creek in Moffat County almost to Rogers Pass. Division of Wildlife. Dan Slauson. Photo taken: 9/14/2008.

South Boulder Creek in Moffat County almost to Rogers Pass. Division of Wildlife. Dan Slauson. Photo taken: 9/14/2008.

 

Colorado Trout Unlimited (CTU) is pleased to announce that we are accepting proposals for the Leo Gomolchak Conservation Grants Program, named for Leo Gomolchak, a longtime CTU staffer and volunteer who worked tirelessly to promote wild and native trout restoration in Colorado. This program is designed to benefit conservation efforts and organizational development at the chapter level by providing seed money which can be used as a starting point in financing grassroots conservation and/or education activities. Under this program, they are inviting chapters to apply for grants of up to $1,500.  The application process and review criteria are described below. The application deadline is March 2. Read more and apply HERE

The Nature Conservancy is working to promote environmental education through the creation of Nature Works Everywhere gardens. The core principle behind the Gardens program is that gardens model conservation science on a relatable scale. The program empowers students and teachers to work together to create and implement their own solutions to environmental challenges in their communities. Grants of up to $2,000 will be awarded to support projects that implement green infrastructure to address local environmental challenges. These include access to healthy food, air quality, heat island effect, climate change, and storm water collection. Through the program, young people will work as social innovators to help their communities through project design and implementation. Link to Complete RFP.

Colorado's Water Plan Grant Opportunities: The purpose of the Water Plan Grant funding is to make progress on the critical actions identified in the Colorado’s Water Plan (CWP) and its Measurable Objectives. All applications will be assessed based on funds available for a particular CWP Measurable Objective category. The Board will select projects, programs and activities to fund from applications that have the best opportunity to make progress on the CWP’s Measurable Objectives or critical actions. The CWCB staff reserves the right to negotiate with successful applicants to modify the scope and budget of their project to better meet the CWP objectives in light of fund availability. CWCB staff will evaluate applications and recommend projects to the CWCB Board for final approval at its regularly scheduled Board meetings. Learn more HERE.

The National Water Quality Initiative will work in priority watersheds to help farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners improve water quality and aquatic habitats in impaired streams. Natural Resource Conservation Service will help producers implement conservation and management practices through a systems approach to control and trap nutrient and manure runoff. Qualified producers will receive assistance for installing conservation practices such as cover crops, filter strips and terraces. More Details HERE.

The Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP), provided through the Natural Resource Conservation Service, is a voluntary conservation program that helps agricultural producers in a manner that promotes agricultural production and environmental quality as compatible goals. Through EQIP, agricultural producers receive financial and technical assistance to implement structural and management conservation practices that optimize environmental benefits on working agricultural land. EQIP applications are accepted on a continuous basis, however, NRCS establishes application "cut-off" or submission deadline dates for evaluation, ranking and approval of eligible applications. EQIP is open to all eligible agricultural producers and submitted applications may be considered or evaluated in multiple funding pool opportunities. To learn more CLICK HERE.

The Colorado Water Conservation Board Water Supply Reserve Account (WSRA) Program provides grants and loans to assist Colorado water users in addressing their critical water supply issues and interests. The funds help eligible entities complete water activities, which may include competitive grants for: Technical assistance regarding permitting, feasibility studies and environmental compliance; Studies or analysis of structural, nonstructural consumptive and nonconsumptive water needs, projects or activities; and structural and nonstructural water projects or activities. For more information click HERE.

Colorado Water Conservation Board Water Efficiency Grant Program. The Water Efficiency Grant Program provides financial assistance to communities, water providers, and eligible agencies for water conservation-related activities and projects. Eligible entities, as well as state and local governments and agencies, can receive funding to develop water conservation and drought plans, implement water conservation goals outlined in a water conservation plan and educate the public about water conservation.
Types of Water Efficiency Grants available - Click on programs below for more information about each and how to apply:

Tamarisk Coalition has a list of riparian restoration funding opportunities maintained by the Tamarisk Coalition.  For list click  restoration funding opportunities.

Trainings and Workshops Late February

Launching Off - Duck Research. Duck research in the field conducted by Avian Researcher, Jon Runge in the North Park area. Photo taken by DOW employee Michelle Gallagher. Division of Wildlife. Michelle Gallagher, Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Launching Off - Duck Research. Duck research in the field conducted by Avian Researcher, Jon Runge in the North Park area. Photo taken by DOW employee Michelle Gallagher. Division of Wildlife. Michelle Gallagher, Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

FEBRUARY 20th and 27th, 2018: The Hutchins Water Center at Colorado Mesa University invites you to participate in the 2018 Water Course, which will cover Hydrology and Water Law in Colorado; Preparing for a Drier Future; and Grand Valley Initiatives to Improve Habitat and River Access. Click HERE to learn more and register.

FEBRUARY 20th, 2018: Join EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM). Train to use this system. SWMM is a dynamic hydrology-hydraulic water quality simulation model. It is used for single event or long-term (continuous) simulation of runoff quantity and quality from primarily urban areas. The runoff component operates on a collection of sub-catchment areas that receive precipitation and generate runoff and pollutant loads. The routing portion transports this runoff through a system of pipes, channels, storage/treatment devices, pumps, and regulators. SWMM tracks the quantity and quality of runoff made within each sub-catchment. It tracks the flow rate, flow depth, and quality of water in each pipe and channel during a simulation period made up of multiple time steps. SWMM 5 has been extended to model the hydrologic performance of specific types of low impact development (LID) controls. This training is FREE! Find more information and registration access HERE.

FEBRUARY 20th-21st, 2018: Irrigation Association: Principles of Irrigation Landscape. Master fundamental theory and application principles for turf and landscape in this intensive session for experienced irrigators (taught in Imperial units). Two full days in Berthoud, CO covers soil-waterplant relationships, advanced hydraulics, electricity, pumps, specialty valves and irrigation equipment. Learn more HERE .

FEBRUARY 22nd, 2018: Irrigation Association: Landscape Water Management & Planning. Learn how to create water budgets, develop irrigation schedules, document water usage and plan for periods of drought. This full-day class will help attendees maximize the benefits of smart technology and work effectively with water providers. Find more information HERE.

FEBRUARY 28th- MARCH 2nd, 2018: Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colorado is hosting a Community-Based Collaborative Conservation Workshop. Community-based collaborative conservation (CBCC) is an effective approach to solving some of the most complex natural resource issues in the Rocky Mountain region. Objectives include: Understand existing resources, identify barriers to participation, identify new resources and opportunities, develop and prioritize strategies to address these, seek agreement on the most effective and efficient way to connect CBCC practitioners, and unify these understandings into an action plan. To read more about this workshop, click HERE.

MARCH 1st-2nd, 2018: National Stormwater Center is offering their Certified Stormwater Inspector (municipal) training in Municipal Denver, CO. Designed specifically for MS4 personnel, this course focuses on stormwater permit compliance as the key to restore and maintain the waters of the United States. Testing will be conducted. Graduates of the Certified Stormwater Inspector course receive certification for 5 years and continuing education units, and ongoing, unlimited support of the National Stormwater Center.  All of their instructors have stormwater enforcement experience at the Federal or State level. Students are expected to achieve a minimum overall score of 75% to be awarded 1.2 CEUs (Continuing Education Units) from National Stormwater Center, and a five (5) year CSI™ Inspector Certificate. This certification indicates that the services are being performed by professionals who have completed the stormwater inspector certification requirements and have met established standards of knowledge, experience, and competence required in the field of stormwater inspections. Learn more and register HERE

MARCH 9th, 2018: Snow to Stream: A Workshop and SNOTEL Field Trip in Carbondale, ColoradoIn Colorado, snow is more than a type of weather; it's a way of life. What might be less apparent is what snowpack means in terms water, soil moisture, and forest health, and how climate variability is impacting it all. Join Water Education Colorado and Roaring Fork Conservancy for this day-long workshop and field trip exploring the nexus between climate, snow, and water!  This workshop and field trip will be geared toward educators, but is open to the public and will be interesting for anyone wishing to learn more about these topics. The afternoon will feature a unique opportunity to visit a SNOTEL site at the top of McClure Pass! Participants will learn how to conduct a snow course survey and will then have the opportunity to collect samples themselves. They'll finish the day by snowshoeing to the actual SNOTEL site. Participants will walk away with the knowledge and resources to educate others about snow science, climate, forest health and more. Learn more and register HERE.

 

The Center for Watershed Protection presents Watershed and Stormwater Webcast Series:

  • Stream and BMP Monitoring- March 21, 2018, 1-2:30 PM EST
  • Bioretention Design Modifications- May 16, 2018, 1-2:30 PM EST
  • Retrofitting the Urban Environment: What’s New?- June 20, 2018, 1-2:30 PM EST
  • Stormwater and Green Infrastructure for Combined Sewer Systems- September 12, 2018, 1-2:30 PM EST
  • Innovations in Stream Restoration Design and Construction- October 10, 2018, 1-2:30 PM ES
  • It Ain’t Easy Getting Green: Incentivizing Watershed Programs- November 14, 2018, 1-2:30 PM EST

Find pricing information and registration HERE.

MARCH 29th, 2018: Water Education Colorado invites you to the 2018 Climate and Colorado's Water Future Workshop in Lakewood, Colorado. Curious about how Colorado's climate impacts the management our water? In Colorado we always hear about snowpack, river levels, and weather changing on a daily basis, but how does it all connect and what does the future of our water resources look like with a variable climate? This workshop will explore the potential impacts of climate change on Colorado's water future and explore how we can meet our demands for water—agricultural, household and business use, plus environmental and recreational benefits—and still deliver water downstream to satisfy interstate agreements. Participants will walk away with a comprehensive look at the relationship between our water resources and the climate and get a unique opportunity to tour the National Ice Core Laboratory! Find more information HERE.

MARCH 29th, 2018: Urban Watersheds Research Institute presents: Regional Statistical Hydrology and Flood Prediction training. BIG DATA and its use is the new wave sweeping much of current technology and appears to be the direction in which much of hydrologic analysis is being done and will increase in application over time. This class will bring to you the cutting-edge information in how to use the data available from public agencies (mostly USGS) to conduct hydrologic analysis, if for no other reason than to calibrate distributed rainfall-runoff models such as SWMM, HEC-MHS, etc. You will be eligible to receive 1.5 CEU's or 15 PDH's. You will receive 12 ASFPM Core CEC’s for CFM certification. Find everything you need to know HERE.

SPRING 2018: For the first time One World One Water Center will offer a Water Studies Online Certificate through Metropolitan State University of Denver! Participants are required to complete four courses: Water Law, U.S. Water Concerns, Colorado Water and the American West and a final capstone project. For more information and to register: click here.

APRIL 24th-26th, 2018: Join FLOW 2018, Managing Rivers, Reservoirs, and Lakes in the Face of Drought in Fort Collins, CO.There is a limit to the number of attendees that can be accommodated, so don’t miss your chance to join this international gathering of instream flow specialists, practioners, water managers, and scientists to learn practical tools and strategies for sustaining and protecting ecological values of water during droughts and periods of water shortage. There are still openings to present a poster describing strategies and tools that conjunctively maintain the viability of rivers, reservoirs, and lakes associated with mitigating drought. The poster abstract submission deadline has been EXTENDED to March 1, 2018! Applicants will be notified of poster acceptance as soon as possible following submission. Only 28 posters can be accommodated, so act soon. Visit HERE to learn more about abstract submission and poster format guidelines. Day 1: A daylong training session where you can select 2 of the 4 available training sessions (1 in the morning and 1 in the afternoon) on: FERC hydropower licensing, water law concepts for dealing with drought, reducing uncertainty in riverine ecosystems during environmental change, or handling information in water management issues. Days 2 and 3: Presentations by internationally recognized experts providing examples on the use and need of effective laws, policies, science, and public participation to meet water management objectives for rivers, reservoirs, and lakes under drought conditions. Access the program HERE; register HERE; book hotel rooms HERE.

MAY 14th-18th, 2018: Larimer County is holding the annual Ranger Excellence School. Early registration is now available.  Please go to our website listed below to find out more information and register your staff early.  It will be held at the Budweiser Event Center in Loveland, Colorado. This year They are offering courses in Ranger Leadership, Wildlife Encounters, Scene size up, low angel rescue training,  OC/Pepper Spray Certification, Baton Certification, Medical, Driving, and Self Defense , just to name a few.  They will also have demonstrations on e bikes, Wildlife K9s, Drones, and a Helicopter Evacuation demonstration. This is a dynamic and hands on training in all the areas a park ranger needs to be an effective asset to their agencies.  This is open to not only rangers but all other staff in Natural Resources that are interested.  More information can be found HERE.

Water Education Colorado's Water Fluency Program

A professional development course for non-water professionals. Learn the language of water and develop tools for navigating water management and policy issues so you can lead with confidence. Water is critical for every aspect of community vibrancy, from industry to commerce to agriculture, tourism, health, and the environment—but it isn't always clear how policy and management decisions around water trickle down to affect other sectors or vice versa. This comprehensive program will help you make those connections. Four in-person classroom days; water-focused site visits; and online discussions and homework between classroom days. The scheduled program dates are: 

  • May 22 and 23 in Pueblo
  • June 22 in Colorado Springs
  • July 20 in Fountain

The topics will include:

  • Colorado's water resources (the role of water in society, the economic value of water, ties to public policy, emerging issues)
  • Legal and institutional frameworks (water law and administration, project planning and approval, interbasin projects and agreements)
  • Water resource management (watershed health, environmental protection, water quality, natural disasters)
  • Colorado water for the future (assessing supply and meeting demand, ecosystem values, conservation and land use, alignment of resources and policies)

Registration is open from February 14, 2018-April 14, 2018 or until the class is full. The class will be capped at 35 people to ensure a quality experience. Find out more HERE, and register HERE.

JUNE 4th-7th, 2018: COMMUNITY-BASED SOCIAL MARKETING WORKSHOPS with Doug McKenzie-Mohr, Ph.D. This two-day workshop provides a comprehensive introduction to community-based social marketing and how it is being applied throughout the world to foster behaviors that protect the environment and promote health and safety. Those who attend the workshop will learn the five steps of community-based social marketing (selecting behaviors, identifying barriers, developing strategies, conducting pilots, and broad scale implementation) and be exposed to numerous case studies illustrating its use. Explore this more and register HERE.

JULY 9th-12th and 16th-19th, 2018: Mountain Studies Institute (MSI) accepts high school students rising to 11 or 12th grades, or recent high school graduates (with occasional exceptions for younger students). Students from San Miguel, Ouray, Dolores, San Juan, La Plata, Archuleta, and Montezuma counties are invited to apply. Join the San Juans' most immersive and engaging mountain science program!  During the two week, rigorous field course program, students explore topics and careers in the sciences and natural resources by day, and camp and explore in the evenings. During the program, interns gain hands-on experience contributing to real-world environmental science projects. Students work side-by-side with a small group of other interns from across the San Juan Mountains. The program is led by mentors from MSI and more than 20 local science professionals.  Students interact with natural resource managers and researchers in the field to learn about ecology, geology, hydrology, wildlife, and forestry. They will dive into topics such as air and water quality, climate change, mine reclamation, fen restoration, and forest health. Find more information HERE!

Job Announcements Late February

Hardeman SWA on the upper Arkansas River in Lake County. Division of Wildlife. Michael Seraphin, Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Photo taken: 7/5/2005.

Hardeman SWA on the upper Arkansas River in Lake County. Division of Wildlife. Michael Seraphin, Colorado Parks and Wildlife. Photo taken: 7/5/2005.

 

Wildlands Restoration Volunteers seeks a full-time, Leadership Opportunity Executive Director. The Executive Director is responsible for managing WRV’s overall operations and reporting to the Board of Directors. Responsibilities include organizational strategic planning, financial management, staff management, fund development, partnership development, marketing oversight, and program/project oversight.  The Executive Director leads WRV’s continuing efforts to build a vibrant community of staff and volunteers who are fully committed to implementing WRV’s mission across the region. Click HERE to read more about the job and to apply. 

Mountain Park Environmental Center is seeking a Physical Plant Manager. The manager would maintain the interior and exterior of all buildings/structures in all seasons; direct the overall operation of the physical plant services in accordance with policies and procedures, current federal, state and local standards, guidelines and regulations to assure that the facility is maintained in a safe and comfortable manner; maintain physical plant tools and vehicles. This position has irregular hours, including some evenings and weekends, and regularly requires travel between campuses. Click HERE for more information and to apply. 

The Ken-Caryl Ranch Parks Department is accepting applications for a Parks Maintenance Worker. This is a year-round hourly position. Duties include all aspects of parks maintenance work with an emphasis in horticulture. Experience using best horticultural practices is beneficial. Duties may include, but are not limited to, the following: Maintenance involving flower and shrub care, assist the Horticultural Technician in diagnosis of pests and diseases in plant materials, safely operate equipment such as pruners, hedge trimmers, tiller, backpack sprayers and water truck. Must be flexible to work nights and weekends and to assist in snow removal activities. Applicants must provide a MVR showing a good driving history before an offer of employment will be made. Click HERE for more.

The Town of Erie Parks Department is currently accepting applications for a Lead Seasonal Park Maintenance position which will lead seasonal staff in a variety of parks maintenance activities in support of open space, parks, trails, sports fields, special events and other support activities. This is a seasonal/temporary position/assignment. Find more HERE.

Larimer County Department of Natural Resources is seeking skilled and motivated individuals to join our team. The Land Stewardship Worker position provides a unique and rewarding seasonal employment opportunity for the spring and summer of 2018. Individuals will conduct invasive plant management and other restoration duties as needed on federal, state, county public lands, rights-of-way and private property within Larimer County. The ideal candidate will possess knowledge pertaining to native and non-native plants, desire to work outside in the back-country, initiative to work unsupervised, and is physically fit. All those hired will receive on-the-job training. Click HERE for details and to apply. Application is open until filled.

Steamboat Lake State Park is currently accepting applications for their seasonal positions. Current positions include: Aquatic Nuisance Species Inspectors, Maintenance Technicians, Vegetation Management Technician, Visitor Center Attendant and Limited Commission Park Rangers. Hourly pay varies and housing is available. Find the varied options HERE.

Colorado Natural Heritage Program seeks seasonal BLM Aquatic AIM Monitoring Lead and Field Technicians; 3 Lead Technicians and 6 Field Technicians to be exact. In partnership with the Utah Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the Colorado Natural Heritage Program (CNHP) is seeking experienced field technicians to collect stream monitoring data through BLM’s aquatic Assessment, Inventory and Monitoring (AIM) initiative. Successful applicants will be trained in aquatic AIM sampling protocols by the National Aquatic Monitoring Center of Utah State University and will sample stream habitat for wadeable rivers and streams on BLM lands throughout Utah. All Technicians must be available for the two-week training starting May 14, 2018. Three field teams of three technicians each (1 Lead Technician and 2 Field Technicians) will be hired. Each team will be stationed in a separate BLM Field Office: one each in Salt Lake City, Vernal, and Moab, Utah. The teams will work closely with Utah BLM Aquatic Biologists and other BLM staff within the Field Offices. Crews will spend 4–8 days in a row in the field, often camping away from the Field Office location. Data collection will include water quality sampling, stream habitat data, and benthic macro invertebrates. First consideration of applicants will begin February 15, 2018. Applications will continue to be accepted until all positions are filled or until April 30, 2018, whichever comes first. Applicants for the Lead Technician Position are encouraged to apply early. Read more and apply HERE.

A variety of jobs are currently available in the City of Aurora including but not limited to Water and Environment. Click HERE to find out more.

South Suburban Parks and Recreation is seeking a Part Time Park Ranger (Bike) who would perform a variety of professional duties in the field of Resource Management and Visitor Services.  Responsible for work in wildlife, resource management, park maintenance, environmental education, public relations, routine bicycle patrol, and enforcement District 'Park Rules and Regulations. Applications will be accepted until February 23, 2018 at 5pm. Click HERE for more. 

Jefferson County Parks and Recreation is hiring for a number of positions. Click HERE for the list; click the arrow under the "Department" header to group the Parks and Recreation jobs. Application deadlines are as soon as February 25th, 2018.

The Longmont and Boulder Valley Conservation District is looking to fill the role of a Forester. This position reports to the Conservation Districts' District Manager and the NRCS District Conservationist. The position undertakes a variety of office and fieldwork duties, with a focus on the support and delivery of USDA Farm Bill programs through partnership with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). The selected candidate will work with NRCS, Conservation District staff, and various partner organizations to assist private landowners in the planning and implementation of forest conservation practices. Click HERE for the full description. Applications will be considered until the position is filled; however, applications should be submitted by February 28, 2018 for full consideration.

City of Denver’s Parks & Recreation Department is now accepting applications for a Campground Attendants to work at the Chief Hosa Campground for the 2018 camping season! There are 4 vacant Campground Attendant positions.  The Campground Attendant positions will work primarily in the service booth at the Chief Hosa Campground in an administrative and guest relations capacity.  These positions will be responsible for proper intake and checkout of guests within the campground and will work closely with Denver Mountain Parks operations staff and Park Rangers to ensure that guests are aware of and adhere to all campground rules and policies. Application deadline is at the end of February 28th, 2018. Click HERE for more details.

Rocky Mountain Conservancy has a number of job openings: 

  • Field Coordinators (2 openings): Field Coordinators will help the Director of Conservation plan, implement, and evaluate Corps programs. This will include developing training and educational programs, conducting field visits, supervising crew work in-the-field, and providing individual feedback to crew members. For more information visit HEREApplication close date: February 28, 2018.
  • Conservation Corps Crew Member (Ages 18-25) (28 openings): This AmeriCorps-based position serves a total of 450 hours over the course of eleven-weeks. Members will serve on crews completing conservation projects in Rocky Mountain National Park and the Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forests. Throughout the term of service, members will also participate in leadership training, educational programming, and career development activities. Upon success completion, members will receive an AmeriCorps Education Award. This position receive a living stipend ($300/week), accommodations, and all necessary gear and work clothing for the program. Information about the Crew Member positions can be found HEREApplication close date: March 18, 2018.
  • High School Leadership Corps Member (Ages 14-17) (20 openings): The High School Leadership Corps members serve two-week terms in Rocky Mountain National Park completing conservation projects with the National Park Service, participating in outdoor recreation activities, and developing leadership skills. During the two-weeks, members will camp in Rocky Mountain National Park (all gear is provided). As part of the opportunity, youth will receive work clothing and a completion stipend of $400 for their service. More information click HEREApplication close date: April 8, 2018.

Estes Valley Land Trust is seeking a Stewardship Intern. The Estes Valley Land Trust holds more than 160 conservation easements that preserve nearly 10,000 acres of land. The Stewardship Intern’s primary responsibility is to ensure each conservation easement is monitored in 2018. This includes coordinating monitoring visits with volunteers, collecting completed reports and digital files and updating natural resource reports. Click HERE for more about Estes Valley Land Trust, and HERE for details and information on the job and application. Application deadline is March 2nd, 2018.

The Conservation Center is excited to start looking for their next Healthy Forests Initiative AmeriCorps VISTA. In late March, the new VISTA will join their team! The Healthy Forests Initiative VISTA can expect to:

  • Team up with The Nature Connection and GOCO Inspire in strengthening and building the Youth Outdoor Network, which is a group that creates pathways to natural resource careers for local high schoolers;
  • Get their hands dirty on trail stewardship days with the Paonia Ranger District of the US Forest Service;
  • Get kids outside with Conservation Days and Every Kid in a Park; 
  • Lead community outreach event planning, like the Mountainfilm World Tour and the Float Fest;
  • Build partnerships with public lands agencies; 
  • And work in a dog-friendly office with Juniper, Jude, and sometimes Luna!

If this sounds like your cup of tea, you can apply here and find application instructions here. Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis until filled.  Applications will be accepted through March 26th, 2018.

Volunteers for Outdoor Colorado (VOC) seeks two full-time Seasonal Project Managers to work closely with the VOC project team to provide professional project management, logistical support, and volunteer leadership coordination on VOC volunteer projects both administratively and in the field. This Seasonal Project Manager is a full-time, term-limited, non-exempt position that reports to VOC’s Senior Projects and Trainings Manager. This position works within the VOC program team and closely with two other project managers to provide professional project management, logistical support and volunteer leadership coordination on VOC volunteer projects administratively and in the field. Learn more and apply HERE.

Little Thompson Water District is seeking a Water Resources/Engineering Technician. Under supervision of the District Engineer, the Water Resources/Engineering Technician performs a variety of support functions in water resources, engineering, and geographic information systems. Read more and apply HERE.

Pawnee Buttes Seed, Inc. specialists in seed for pasture, reclamation, turf, and conservation for over 20
years is seeking applications for the position of Marketing/Advertising Coordinator. Duties include:

  • Develop and execute seasonal advertising campaigns
  • Design and write print, radio and digital advertisements
  • Coordinate and implement organization’s social media strategy
  • Maintain and update marketing and advertising budget as needed
  • Create and update all email marketing including monthly e-newsletter, event emails and other
  • marketing emails
  • Maintain all promotional materials
  • Assist with planning and coordination for special events/activities

Find application information HERE.

 

Conferences and Events Late February

Avian Researcher, Jon Runge conducting duck research in North Park on the Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge. Photo taken by DOW employee Michelle Gallagher. Division of Wildlife. Michelle Gallagher, Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

Avian Researcher, Jon Runge conducting duck research in North Park on the Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge. Photo taken by DOW employee Michelle Gallagher. Division of Wildlife. Michelle Gallagher, Colorado Parks and Wildlife.

MARCH 2nd - 3rd, 2017: 2018 Advancing Environmental Education Conference, "emPowered by Nature", Auraria Campus, Denver, CO. Colorado’s Advancing Environmental Education Conference is annually hosted by the Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education (CAEE), a statewide leader in environmental education since 1989. CAEE facilitates communication, coordination, resource sharing and professional development to advance environmental education among over 850 members across the state among various sectors.  Information about the Conference Event.

MARCH 30th, 2018: THE UNIVERSITY OF DENVER WATER LAW REVIEW
ELEVENTH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM; Forging Sovereignty, Self Determination, and Solidarity through Water Law. Water has long served as a source of both great conflict and critical collaboration in the history of the United States. Especially for historically marginalized communities of American Indians, Latin@s, and Blacks, ownership, control, access and distribution of water rights has often been fleeting and limited in both scope and duration. Though these same communities have contested their marginalization in the realm of water law and policy sometimes through courts and other times through political and social mobilization, they have encountered apathy, resistance and sometimes hostility to their claims. The consequence is a contemporary United States where insecurity and uncertainty over water rights and quality are represented in the on-going struggle of the Standing Rock Sioux to assert their sovereignty over the Missouri River, the political and legal fight of the majority Black residents of Flint, Michigan to expect clean water to be distributed by its municipal government, and the vocal efforts of Latin@ farmers to maintain centuries old communal and cultural practices to their ditches. Learn more and register HERE.

APRIL 10th, 2018: Join the Center for Watershed Protection's 2018 National Conference to learn fresh ideas about watershed and stormwater funding and management. Today’s water quality experts not only have to overcome pollution, but also a world of uncertain federal funding and regulatory oversight. To restore our waterways, identifying innovative financing strategies and management solutions is more important than ever before. This conference will help practitioners, regulators, water and sewer authorities and stormwater managers overcome common hurdles — from staff shortages and a lack of financial support to addressing multiple pollutant sources in mixed land use watersheds. Register online or attend at one of their in-person hub locations. Spots are limited. Find more information and register HERE.

APRIL 18th, 2018: The Center for Watershed Protection is hosting the 2018 National Watershed and Stormwater Conference, which is designed for water management from all sectors, practitioners, regulators, and water and sewer authorities, and will present case studies and best practices as well as address cross cutting issues and emerging trends. This will take place online and at remote hub locations. Registration begins soon. Questions can be answered by emailing: center@cwp.org, or calling 410-461-8323. For more on the Center for Watershed Protection, click HERE.

APRIL 21st, 2018: The Granite Creek Cleanup has become a rite-of-spring community event that makes a difference. Over 500 friends and neighbors come together to clean up our creeks, lakes, and trails, and to celebrate our community’s waterways and natural places. Won’t you join them? Register HERE

APRIL 29th-May 1st, 2018: The 2nd Annual Next Generation Water Summit. The Summit focuses on water conservation and water reuse in the arid Southwest. It brings together builders, designers, architects and water professionals to share best practices and brainstorm new ones through charrettes. In 2018, their featured keynote speaker will be Jonathan Overpeck. Overpeck’s visionary work has been at the forefront of the heated climate change public debates and identifying the risks to managing water resources, providing valuable insights into past climate variability and change in the Southwest. He will present on the Climate Change forecasted impact to the Colorado River flows. There are over 40 unique sessions planned with speakers from AZ, CA, CO, NM, TX. On the morning of May 1, they will hold two charrettes, where they will have multiple stakeholders dive into a challenging topic. These charrettes will have very limited seating, so sign up today! Learn more and register HERE.

MAY 2nd-4th, 2018: San Juan Mining and Reclamation Conference - Planning for Resiliency will be held in Creede, Colorado. The format of this conference encourages discussions of how the mining and reclamation community can plan for potential disasters and invites bold and frank conversations about topics that have challenged you, may be considered taboo, or can be uncomfortable to share. Topic examples include, but are not limited to: Longevity of mines; Lifetime of watershed groups; Risk assessment, tolerance, and mitigation; Effectively communicating risk; Fiduciary responsibility and abandoned mines (Good Samaritan Law); Scenario planning; Adaptive management; Environmental justice; New regulations and their impact; Planning for natural disasters and severe weather events; Changes in relationships, partners and stakeholders. Contact UWPcommunications@gmail.com or call 970-325-3010 for more information.

MAY 9th-11th, 2018: Advancing Colorado by Investing in the Outdoors Workshop. The Partners in the Outdoors Conference brings together organizations, agencies, schools, businesses and communities engaged in the future of Colorado's conservation and outdoor recreational opportunities. Together, we can improve the quality of life for all Coloradans by promoting awareness and respect for natural resources, sustainable growth of businesses, and responsible hunting, fishing, and outdoor recreation. Learn more HERE.

MAY 29th-June 1st, 2018: The Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2018 Annual Meeting will be held at the Hilton Denver City Center in Denver, Colorado. This unique meeting is themed “Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice, and Policy – An Exchange of Expertise.” Reserve your spot to network and build professional connections with the highest level of wetland professionals at the 2018 Annual Meeting. Simply complete and return the Exhibitor Agreement to reserve your booth today! Agreements must be received by April 30, 2018. Click HERE for more information.

NOVEMBER 7th-8th, 2018: 8th Annual Upper Colorado River Basin Water Forum will be held at CMU University Center in Grand Junction, CO. For more, click HERE.

Announcements Late February

Echo Lake, near Mt. Evans. Mt. Evans can be accessed through Bergen Park (Evergreen) or by Hwy 103 out of Idaho Springs. Division of Wildlife. David Hannigan. Photo taken: 6/16/2009.

Echo Lake, near Mt. Evans. Mt. Evans can be accessed through Bergen Park (Evergreen) or by Hwy 103 out of Idaho Springs. Division of Wildlife. David Hannigan. Photo taken: 6/16/2009.

San Juan Mining and Reclamation Conference - Planning for Resiliency will be held in Creede, Colorado, May 2nd-4th. This is a CALL FOR ABSTRACTS! The format of this conference encourages discussions of how the mining and reclamation community can plan for potential disasters and invites bold and frank conversations about topics that have challenged you, may be considered taboo, or can be uncomfortable to share. Topic examples include, but are not limited to: Longevity of mines; Lifetime of watershed groups; Risk assessment, tolerance, and mitigation; Effectively communicating risk; Fiduciary responsibility and abandoned mines (Good Samaritan Law); Scenario planning; Adaptive management; Environmental justice; New regulations and their impact; Planning for natural disasters and severe weather events; Changes in relationships, partners and stakeholders. CALL FOR ABSTRACTS Deadline: Mar. 3, 2018. Click HERE learn more about the conference, and HERE to find full information, instructions, and process for submitting the abstract.

The Society of Wetland Scientists’ 2018 Annual Meeting will be held at the Hilton Denver City Center in Denver, Colorado, May 29th-June 1st. This unique meeting is themed “Wetland Science: Integrating Research, Practice, and Policy – An Exchange of Expertise.” Reserve your spot to network and build professional connections with the highest level of wetland professionals at the 2018 Annual Meeting. Simply complete and return the Exhibitor Agreement to reserve your booth today! Agreements must be received by April 30, 2018. Click HERE for more information.

WE NEED YOU TO READ TO A CLASSROOM! Colorado Literacy Project brings Colorado Farmers and Ranchers into the classroom to read a book about agriculture to students. Teachers register their classes with CFA to let us know they want a volunteer to visit and read to their students. During March, April and May students and their teachers can learn about food from the Colorado farmers and ranchers who produce it.
• Start to finish, the Literacy Project takes about 45 minutes.
• Literacy volunteers set up times to visit schools.
• Volunteers read to students in kindergarten through fifth grade.
• Following the reading, volunteers do an activity with students and share their
experiences in agriculture.

Read more and sign up HERE!

Rancher on Crystal River agrees to change diversions to benefit river. After more than a year of back and forth with Pitkin County officials, the nonprofit Colorado Water Trust announced Tuesday a pilot agreement with a Carbondale rancher to increase streamflows in the Crystal River during dry years. The three-year agreement will compensate Bill Fales and Marj Perry, who own the 600-acre Cold Mountain Ranch just west of Carbondale, for retiming their irrigation practices to leave water in the Crystal River when it needs a boost. Read the full story HERE.

Colorado State Forest Service: Water trees during winter drought. "Adequately watering your trees is the best way to ensure optimum health and vigor that will carry through to the growing season," Wood said, according to a press release "Overly dry trees become susceptible to root and branch die-back, and subsequent insect and disease problems." Read more HERE.

Mining water: Aurora Water hopes 'innovative' approach will secure more water, address defunct Colorado gold mine issues. Aurora Water officials are pursuing a $125 million purchase of underground water at the London Mine complex as a new water source to sustain the Colorado Front Range development. It may seem odd, given that discharges from that mine have contaminated the watershed for years, but utility officials have a plan. Read the full story HERE.

On Impaired Rivers, Reclaiming Native Habitat One Mile at a Time. From river rafter to restorer, Conservation Corps leader Mike Wight fights to protect western watersheds from invasive species. Read the story HERE.